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Keynote Lectures

Multi-stakeholder Digitalization: A Key to Building More Sustainable and Resilient Supply Chains?
Joseph Sarkis, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, United States

Available soon.
Fei Tao, Beihang University, China

 

Multi-stakeholder Digitalization: A Key to Building More Sustainable and Resilient Supply Chains?

Joseph Sarkis
Worcester Polytechnic Institute
United States
 

Brief Bio
Joseph Sarkis is a Professor of Management within the Business School at Worcester Polytechnic Institute.  He earned his Ph.D. from the University of Buffalo.  His research and teaching interests include Environmental Sustainability, Technology, Operations and Supply Chain Management. He has authored over 500 publications appearing in a wide variety of outlets. He is currently Editor-in-Chief of IEEE Engineering Management Review and Associate Editor for the journal Resources, Conservation and Recycling on the topic of sustainable supply chains. His editorial positions cover many leading journals in Operations, Transportation, Supply Chain, and Sustainability Management.  Joe has been recognized as a Highly Cited Researcher for each year from 2015-2020 by Thomson-Reuters/Clarivate Analytics (Web-of-Science). He is an AT&T Industrial Ecology Fellow and has served as a research scholar at universities throughout the world; he currently holds a position of International Scholar within the Hanken School of Economics’ HUMLOG Institute.  He is a coordinator within the Future Earth Systems of Sustainable Consumption and Production (SSCP) Knowledge-Action Network in the Circular Economy Working Group.  Joe is also an international program coordinator for the Greening of Industry Network (GIN) along with the Greening of Industry Networks book series co-editor for Springer-Nature Publishers.


Abstract
The COVID-19 crisis has afforded a number of learning opportunities for organizations and society in general.  Two particularly notable events were issues related sustainability—especially environmental and social sustainability—and resilience.  In this case supply chains were not immune from either of these events and arguably more sustainable practices and supply chains may have actually provided insights into supply chain resilience.  We revisit some of these issues and provide evidence for and against these possibilities.  We touch on sustainable supply chains, multi-stakeholder digital technologies—such as blockchain technology and virtual communication—circular economy, and other lessons and practices. Practical lessons and research opportunities will also be identified.  Discussion will also be encouraged.



 

 

Available soon.

Fei Tao
Beihang University
China
 

Brief Bio
Available soon.


Abstract
Available soon.



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